Technology

Google Starts Disabling Third-Party Cookies for Chrome Users

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Google has recently taken a significant step towards enhancing user privacy by disabling third-party cookies for a small percentage of Chrome users. This move comes after years of development and testing through its Privacy Sandbox project. As of January 4th, Google has disabled cookies for approximately one percent of Chrome users globally, which translates to around 30 million users. Users included in this initial rollout will receive a notification upon launching their browser, informing them that they are among the first to experience Tracking Protection. The notification explains that Tracking Protection limits websites from utilizing third-party cookies to track their online activities. This proactive approach aims to provide users with a more secure and private browsing experience. Recognizing that this change may temporarily disrupt websites that have not yet adapted to the new system, Google has implemented a feature that allows users to re-enable third-party cookies if necessary. Users can simply click on the eye icon located on their browser bar to toggle off the Tracking Protection feature. The Privacy Sandbox initiative, as the name suggests, serves as an alternative to cookies while still enabling advertisers to deliver targeted ads while prioritizing user privacy. This system assigns users to interest-based groups based on their recent browsing activities. Advertisers can then leverage this information to match users with relevant ads. Notably, all data and processing occur on the user’s device, and Google retains user interests for a period of three weeks. This approach aims to strike a balance between personalized advertising and safeguarding user privacy. However, Google’s Privacy Sandbox project has attracted regulatory attention due to concerns that it may further consolidate the company’s power. Nevertheless, Google plans to gradually roll out Tracking Protection over the coming months, with the goal of disabling third-party cookies for all Chrome users by mid-2024. This phased approach allows websites and advertisers to adapt to the new system while ensuring a smooth transition for users.

Speaking of user privacy, you might be interested in Internet privacy. If you’re curious about the technology behind tracking users, take a look at HTTP cookies. For those who want to understand more about targeted advertising and its implications, check out Behavioral targeting. And to get a grasp on the broader context of Google’s Privacy Sandbox initiative, delve into

Speaking of user privacy, you might be interested in Internet privacy. If you’re curious about the technology behind tracking users, take a look at HTTP cookies. For those who want to understand more about targeted advertising and its implications, check out Behavioral targeting. And to get a grasp on the broader context of Google’s Privacy Sandbox initiative, delve into

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